We are delighted to announce that the first issue of Volume 1 of the Indian Law Review is now available for free download on our website (for a limited period). The issue contains many manifestos expressing the hopes and expectations of our potential readership. It also includes contributions from Krithika Ashok, Lawrence Liang, Mrinal Satish, Adam Perry, Shraddha Kulhari,…

Indian Law Review hopes to publish at least one Literature Review (of around 10,000 words, including footnotes) in every volume. We envisage a Literature Review will not only comprehensively survey existing scholarship (including out-of-print earlier scholarship) on any discrete area of Indian law, but also organise such scholarship thematically and subject it to critical examination. Locating the scholarship…

The privacy hearings before a 9-judge bench (excellently covered by Ujwala Uppaluri on this blog) have excited much attention. Some thoughts on these hearings below: On the adjudicative form: This is how adjudication, especially in a constitutional court, should normally function–a reasonably large bench that takes it time to hear multiple voices on the most fundamental…

(A guest post by Eugene R. Fidell) [Eugene R. Fidell teaches Military Justice at Yale Law School and edits the Global Military Justice Reform blog, globalmjreform.blogspot.com. His book, Military Justice: A Very Short Introduction, was published in 2016 by the Oxford University Press. He served as a judge advocate in the U.S. Coast Guard.] —————…

Guest Post by Thriyambak J. Kannan The Arbitration and Conciliation Act, 1996 (“the Act”), pursuant to the recommendations of the 246th Law Commission Report (“Report”) underwent a series of amendments to rectify what the Commission was informed as, “several inadequacies observed in the functioning of the Act”.[1] Pursuant to these recommendations, the Act was amended by…