I recently wrote 3 guest posts for the Indian Constitutional Law and Philosophy blog reflecting on the legal journey of section 377, culminating in the just-concluded hearings in the Supreme Court.  In the first post, titled “Inclusive Pluralism or Majoritarian Nationalism”, I argued that the Court should use an expansive reading of Article 15 when…

A very promising conference on Contemporary Issues in Public Law will be held at the Australian High Commission at Delhi this Sunday (8 April 2018). The conference invitation and full programme is here . Registration in advance (by emailing public.law.conference.8.april@gmail.com) is free but absolutely essential due to security protocols at the High Commission. The conference will address…

The Chair for Public and Comparative Law at Humboldt University Berlin (Prof. Dr. Philipp Dann) in collaboration with the journal VRÜ / Law and Politics in Africa, Asia and Latin America offers two short-term research scholarships for emerging legal scholars from India. Scholarship holders will spend two months (mid October till mid December 2018) in…

Indian Law Review invites submissions for Case Notes or Legislative Notes on any case decided or legislation passed in India in 2017 (pending cases/bills may be considered if exceptional). A Note should be around 5,000 words (including footnotes). Apart from summarizing the case or legislation in question, it should situate it in the current body of…

DESCRIPTION The Alex Chernov JD Scholarship/Alex Chernov Master of Laws (LLM) Scholarship will be awarded for the first time in 2017 to students from India commencing at Melbourne Law School in 2018. The scholarship is named for Melbourne alumnus the Hon Alex Chernov AC QC, former Governor of Victoria, Judge of the Court of Appeal…

We are delighted to announce that the first issue of Volume 1 of the Indian Law Review is now available for free download on our website (for a limited period). The issue contains many manifestos expressing the hopes and expectations of our potential readership. It also includes contributions from Krithika Ashok, Lawrence Liang, Mrinal Satish, Adam Perry, Shraddha Kulhari,…

Indian Law Review hopes to publish at least one Literature Review (of around 10,000 words, including footnotes) in every volume. We envisage a Literature Review will not only comprehensively survey existing scholarship (including out-of-print earlier scholarship) on any discrete area of Indian law, but also organise such scholarship thematically and subject it to critical examination. Locating the scholarship…