Guest Post by Shreyas Jayasimha, Advocate, Karnataka High Court Karnataka (India) Section of the International Commission of Jurists are delighted to invite you to a seminar on Independence of Judiciary and National Judicial Appointments Commission Date: February 15, 2015 (Sunday) Venue: Karnataka Judicial Academy Crescent House, Crescent Road, Bangalore – 560 001. Background on KSICJ…

Guest Post by Prabha Kotiswaran  King’s College London is organizing its inaugural Transnational Law Summer Institute this July. Do consider applying if you are an early career researcher or doctoral student.   Scholarships are available for exceptional students from across the globe – so please do share with your personal international contacts. Full details are available on the Transnational Law Institute web…

Guest Post on behalf of Jayna Kothari CLPR invites applications for Research Associates at Bangalore.  CLPR is a non-partisan and not-for-profit organization engaged in law and policy research as well as impact litigation in the public interest on a variety of legal issues such as disability discrimination, social rights protection including the right to education,…

A natural assumption regarding any judicial system that seeks to resolve legal disputes, is that lawyers would be permitted to participate in the adjudicatory process, and assist the parties they represent. This assumption is largely codified in Section 30 of the Advocates Act, 1961, which empowers advocates who fulfill the requirements for enrollment under that…

With the passage of the 121st Constitutional Amendment Bill and the attendant National Judicial Appointments Commission Bill, the collegium system of appointments, now 21 years in the making, is sought to be replaced by the newly created National Judicial Appointments Commission (‘NJAC’). Unsurprisingly, concerns over this new method of judicial appointments have been articulated both…

In this short, but finely spun, piece, Suhrith Parthasarathy examines the Supreme Court’s recent contortions over the death penalty. He argues that the forthcoming Law Commission report is an opportunity to clarify Indian jurisprudence on the subject. As a related aside, Eugene Volokh offers this tortured analysis for why Ronald Reagan’s would-be assassin cannot be…

In a recent article, Badrinath Srinivasan examines how India’s courts appoint arbitrators. Under the 1996 Arbitration and Conciliation Act, parties to an international arbitration, who are unable to fully constitute arbitral panels, may ask the Chief Justice of India to help them do so. Similarly, parties in domestic arbitrations may request the local high court’s…