This post is the fourth in a loosely-linked set of posts on colonial continuity in the Indian judiciary. Previous posts can be found here, here and here. In my previous post on India’s ‘British judges’ after Independence, I noted that the assumption of a rigid racial dichotomy between coloniser and colonised replicates colonial assumptions of…

(A guest post by Eugene R. Fidell) [Eugene R. Fidell teaches Military Justice at Yale Law School and edits the Global Military Justice Reform blog, globalmjreform.blogspot.com. His book, Military Justice: A Very Short Introduction, was published in 2016 by the Oxford University Press. He served as a judge advocate in the U.S. Coast Guard.] —————…

Guest Post by Thriyambak J. Kannan The Arbitration and Conciliation Act, 1996 (“the Act”), pursuant to the recommendations of the 246th Law Commission Report (“Report”) underwent a series of amendments to rectify what the Commission was informed as, “several inadequacies observed in the functioning of the Act”.[1] Pursuant to these recommendations, the Act was amended by…